Tag: remote learning

Study: Tutoring Led By Teachers, Staff Leads To Greater Academic Improvement. See more national education news here

| October 6, 2020
Study: Tutoring Led By Teachers, Staff Leads To Greater Academic Improvement. See more national education news here

While an Illuminate Education report found that the “COVID slide” may have caused a learning loss of two to four months in math and reading during the spring, students who interacted frequently with teachers during school closures fared better. The analysis suggests school closures and distance learning will significantly impact reading and math, with kindergartners being most affected. Oral reading is expected to be most pronounced among the 5th-graders.

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Local Education Spotlight — Bilingual report: Anti-Bias and Anti-Racism Town Hall Meeting Scheduled for October 5th. See more local education news here

| September 29, 2020
Local Education Spotlight — Bilingual report: Anti-Bias and Anti-Racism Town Hall Meeting Scheduled for October 5th. See more local education news here

Participants need to RSVP by Thursday, October 1st at 6:00 p.m.

The Flagstaff Unified School District Anti-Bias and Anti-Racism Task Force will host a digital virtual town hall meeting on Monday, October 5, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. so that the community can provide insights on work in the areas of curriculum, professional development, staff diversity, and student behavior/social emotional learning.  The information gathered at the meeting will be considered as part of the Task Force’s report to the FUSD Governing Board meeting scheduled for Tuesday, November 10, 2020.

Individuals interested in participating in the town hall are invited to RSVP via a form available here.  There is a cap on the number of active participants due to technology constraints, but the event will also be live streamed to the Flagstaff Unified School District Facebook, Twitter, and Vimeo accounts so that the public can view the meeting.

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The Pandemic Has Researchers Worried About Teen Suicide. See more national education news here

| September 15, 2020
The Pandemic Has Researchers Worried About Teen Suicide. See more national education news here

Teen and youth anxiety and depression are getting worse since COVID lockdowns began in March, early studies suggest, and many experts say they fear a corresponding increase in youth suicide.

At the end of June, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveyed Americans on their mental health. They found symptoms of anxiety and depression were up sharply across the board between March and June, compared with the same time the previous year. And young people seemed to be the hardest-hit of any group.

Almost 11 percent of all respondents to that survey said they had “seriously considered” suicide in the past 30 days. For those ages 18 to 24, the number was 1 in 4 — more than twice as high.

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Worried about your kids and COVID-19 stress? Spotting signs of stress in children at any age. See more state education news here

| August 18, 2020
Worried about your kids and COVID-19 stress? Spotting signs of stress in children at any age. See more state education news here

Kids and teens may be giving parents clues that COVID-19 is weighing on them emotionally. It could be in their body language, in their evolving behavior, or in their physical appearance.

As a parent, are you catching those small signs? The Rebound Arizona is going through what adults should be watching for in their children.

“It can happen at very young ages and it can show up in lots of different ways,” explained licensed clinical social worker Michael Klinkner with Evolve Counseling and Behavioral Health Services.

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What Parents Can Learn From Child Care Centers That Stayed Open During Lockdowns. See more national education news here

| June 30, 2020
What Parents Can Learn From Child Care Centers That Stayed Open During Lockdowns. See more national education news here

When Arizona schools shut down in mid-March to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Tatiana Laimit, a nurse in Phoenix, knew she needed a backup plan. Laimit is a single mother of a 6-year-old girl and had recently relocated to the area. She didn’t have any friends or family nearby to ask for help.

It was past 8 on a Friday night when she shot off an email to her local YMCA to ask if they were providing emergency care for the children of front-line workers. “And immediately [someone] responded and let me know, ‘Yes.’ ”

Throughout the pandemic, many child care centers have stayed open for the children of front-line workers — everyone from doctors to grocery store clerks. YMCA of the USA and New York City’s Department of Education have been caring for, collectively, tens of thousands of children since March, and both tell NPR they have no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks. As school districts sweat over reopening plans, and with just over half of parents telling pollsters they’re comfortable with in-person school this fall, public health and policy experts say education leaders should be discussing and drawing on these real-world child care experiences.

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A Bold Pitch To Boost School Funding For The Nation’s Most Vulnerable Students. See more national education news here

| June 2, 2020
A Bold Pitch To Boost School Funding For The Nation’s Most Vulnerable Students. See more national education news here

School district lines have become engines of inequity in many states. Not only can they be used to keep children out of a neighborhood’s schools, they can also keep a district’s wealth in. But with many districts facing severe budget cuts because of the coronavirus pandemic, a new report proposes a radical solution:

Leave the lines, but spread the wealth.

The report, titled Clean Slate, comes from EdBuild, a nonprofit that advocates for equitable school funding. It’s a moonshot pitch to many district and state leaders that recommends distributing local property tax revenue more broadly — at the county or even state level. According to EdBuild, only 13 states currently do this.

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