Tag: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

State Superintendent Kathy Hoffman delivers State of Education address. See more state education news here

| February 2, 2021
State Superintendent Kathy Hoffman delivers State of Education address. See more state education news here

The state of education in Arizona was front and center Tuesday when State Superintendent Kathy Hoffman delivered her annual “State of Education” address to the senate and house education committees.

This is Hoffman’s third “State of Education” address. It looked different than years past in that was virtual, but it also felt different as she made her case for more support for school districts and charters as they continue navigating the challenges brought on by the pandemic.

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More young students are headed back to classrooms. Will high schoolers join them? See more national education news here

| February 2, 2021
More young students are headed back to classrooms. Will high schoolers join them? See more national education news here

With the school year more than half over, some educators and students where school remains virtual are coming to grips with a sobering prospect: high schoolers may not return to buildings this school year.

Nearly two-thirds of the nation’s students from kindergarten to fifth grade have the option of some in-person learning, according to a recent estimate by the website Burbio. Only around half of high school students have that option. And while a few places, including Denver, are bringing high schoolers back now, those tracking school reopening plans say they don’t see evidence that the divide will close anytime soon.

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Arizona schools chief on concerns as pandemic disruptions endure. See more state education and legislative news here

| January 26, 2021
Arizona schools chief on concerns as pandemic disruptions endure. See more state education and legislative news here

Arizona’s public schools have about 65,000 fewer students enrolled than the state’s Department of Education would expect and schools cannot account for their whereabouts, according to State Superintendent Kathy Hoffman.

“We do not know where they are,” Hoffman said. “They could have moved out of state. They may be engaged in homeschooling. So there’s a lot of questions around that.”

Hoffman said her office is working with the Arizona Department of Child Safety and the Governor’s Office to help districts identify and reach out to students no longer enrolled in their schools.

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COVID cases among teachers appear to be rising. What does that mean? See more national education news here

| January 19, 2021
COVID cases among teachers appear to be rising. What does that mean? See more national education news here

In New York, Texas, and a slice of the rest of the country where data is available, teachers and other staff where school buildings are open have higher COVID infection rates than their surrounding communities.

Critically, the data does not show whether teachers caught the virus in schools, or offer definitive answers about the risks of school reopening. It’s possible the results reflect more widespread testing among teachers, and the evidence that remote teachers have lower infection rates is mixed. But the latest data complicates our understanding of the risks of school reopening.

“The fact that the staff rates are growing at a faster rate than the community rates is something we should be paying attention to,” said Emily Oster, the Brown University researcher who spearheaded the analysis and collection of this data.

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Witnessing history: Teachers and students left reeling, looking for lessons in an insurrection. See more national education news here

| January 12, 2021
Witnessing history: Teachers and students left reeling, looking for lessons in an insurrection. See more national education news here

Graham Kwiatkowski, a social studies teacher at Curie High School on Chicago’s Southwest Side, stayed up past midnight to watch coverage of the U.S. Capitol takeover and its aftermath. Then, he woke up at 4 a.m. to prepare for his virtual first-period psychology class.

After asking students how they were feeling, Kwiatkowski showed six news photos without captions: three from unchecked rioting on Capitol Hill Wednesday and three of tense standoffs between Black Lives Matter protesters and police officers last summer.

Students knew right away what Kwiatkowski was getting at — and readily launched into a discussion about the difference in law enforcement response.

“Students are so in tune with what’s going on in their city and around the country,” he said. “They knew if this had been a group of 5,000 or 10,000 people of color at the Capitol, the response would not have been the same.”

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Navajo Nation Helps Transform Math Education. See more national education news here

| December 22, 2020
Navajo Nation Helps Transform Math Education. See more national education news here

From intricate numerical systems to astronomical observatories, from suspension bridges to geometrical ornaments and board games, Native American civilizations have been innovators in the fields of mathematics and engineering. 

While European invasion dealt considerable destruction and persecution to Native American cultures, members of Indigenous groups have demonstrated unwavering interest and talent when it comes to mathematics. During World War II, for example, Navajo Code Talkers were revered for their bravery as well as their cryptography skills. “Mathematics is in our blood,” says Henry Fowler of Navajo Bitter-water and Zuni Edgewater clans, who is an associate professor of mathematics at Navajo Technical University. “Our Navajo women are the knowledge keepers, and they instill the love for mathematics into children at an early age.” 

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Schools Plan To Keep Providing Meals Amid Colder Weather, Strained Budgets. See more national education news here

| December 15, 2020
Schools Plan To Keep Providing Meals Amid Colder Weather, Strained Budgets. See more national education news here

While schools have been proactive and creative with their student meal distributions during the pandemic, concerns are growing that programs will struggle in the coming months to keep up with the demands or be unable to reach those in need, warned No Kid Hungry, a campaign of poverty alleviation nonprofit Share Our Strength that aims to end childhood hunger, during a reporter town hall meeting Dec. 3.

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CCC&Y — Keeping the Halloween tradition alive during a time of Covid

| November 3, 2020
CCC&Y — Keeping the Halloween tradition alive during a time of Covid

… Like other holidays this year, Halloween also underwent a transformation this past weekend with more more safe-at-home pumpkin carving and other activities, virtual online parties and other options. But for some children and their parents, how can you really replace the magic  and mystery of the season without the traditional trick-or-treat.

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Gifted Education’s Race Problem. See more national education news here

| October 20, 2020
Gifted Education’s Race Problem. See more national education news here

Nationally, 3.3 million public school students have been identified for gifted education programs, about 6 percent of the total school population. Inequity is the norm. Wealthy schools identify more children as gifted than do poor ones. Black, Latino and indigenous groups are often left out. But can you make gifted education representative? Can we even agree on what “giftedness” is at all?

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Expect More Arizona — Learn How Your Vote Impacts Education Decision-Making at the State, County and Local Level. See more state education news here

| October 13, 2020
Expect More Arizona — Learn How Your Vote Impacts Education Decision-Making at the State, County and Local Level. See more state education news here

Setting education policy is a complicated process that takes place at many levels. Some decisions are made by elected officials and others by you the voter/parent/resident. To help you make sense of the process, here’s a look at which bodies are responsible for making decisions, and how your vote impacts the final outcome.

Close to home, you help elect governing board members for the school district in which you live. Governing board member are elected by their community and board seats are up for election every four years.

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