Tag: Chalkbeat

Why the breakdown of stimulus talks is doubly painful for schools: no money and added uncertainty. See more national education news here

| August 18, 2020
Why the breakdown of stimulus talks is doubly painful for schools: no money and added uncertainty. See more national education news here

With talks over a new coronavirus relief package now stalled, Congress has not only failed to provide more money to schools, but also injected additional uncertainty into an already tumultuous school year.

The consequences will be far-reaching, for America’s schools and the over 50 million students they serve.

For Sharon Contreras, the superintendent of Guilford County schools in North Carolina, that means she’s scouring her budget for ways to pay for HVAC system upgrades, extra buses, and additional custodians.

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Students, how are protests and conversations about racism affecting you? See more national education news here

| June 16, 2020
Students, how are protests and conversations about racism affecting you? See more national education news here

The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis spurred protests against police brutality in cities across the U.S. and forced a national reckoning on racial injustice.

Students are part of the conversation, raising their voices and orchestrating marches in their own communities.

“We see what’s happening,” said Kanara Bramlett, 17, who just graduated from high school in Denver. “We really needed to demonstrate that we as young people have a voice in our community and we’re capable of creating the same amount of change as the adults.”

Chalkbeat wants to amplify young people’s voices even further.

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Voluntary or mandatory? Remote or in person? Districts grapple with summer school questions. See more national education news here

| May 5, 2020
Voluntary or mandatory? Remote or in person? Districts grapple with summer school questions. See more national education news here

What does summer school look like during a pandemic?

Chicago Public Schools, like districts across the country, is still deciding. If public health offices say it’s safe, Chicago may hold summer school in its buildings, perhaps in small groups. If that doesn’t happen, it could be held virtually.

The district has decided one thing: students who received an “incomplete” in a class will get first priority, including students who didn’t complete online work or printed work packets while school buildings were closed. But that decision has raised questions, too, about what’s fair and whether the district will be able to reach students they struggled to help while school was in session.

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Give yourself ‘grace’ — and 7 other tips from teachers to homeschooling families. See more national education news here

| April 7, 2020
Give yourself ‘grace’ — and 7 other tips from teachers to homeschooling families. See more national education news here

Ask five teachers about their expectations for students during extended school closures and they turn around the question.

Instead of worrying about completing school assignments, the teachers advised parents to “do what you can.”

For parents trying to keep their children from languishing at home, learning at the kitchen table can feel anything but simple. There’s the confusion of Google Classroom to-do lists, paper packets of reading and math, and e-mails with activity suggestions, plus the stress, for many, of juggling children and jobs amid the fear and unpredictability of a worldwide pandemic.

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As public schools grow more diverse, school board elections are largely determined by white voters. See more national education news here

| February 4, 2020
As public schools grow more diverse, school board elections are largely determined by white voters. See more national education news here

It’s well known that America’s teachers don’t look much like the country’s students. It turns out that the voters who elect America’s school boards don’t, either.

A new study appears to be the first of its kind to quantify the demographic mismatch, and it’s sizable. Across four states, including California, researchers estimate that school board voters are much whiter and more affluent than the public school student body.

In districts serving mostly students of color, like San Diego and San Francisco, the disparities are particularly striking, nearly 50 percentage points.

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How the gender gap in STEM might get its start in elementary school. See more national education news here

| October 29, 2019
How the gender gap in STEM might get its start in elementary school. See more national education news here

On average, girls do as well as boys on elementary- and middle-school math tests. But by the time students enter the workforce, a big gender gap has emerged, with men earning nearly 80 percent of bachelor’s degrees in engineering and computer science.

A new study offers evidence that the disparity might be getting its start in elementary school classrooms

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Tackling Anxiety Helps Level STEM Playing Field. See more national education news here

| January 29, 2019
Tackling Anxiety Helps Level STEM Playing Field. See more national education news here

Tackling student anxiety can help close the STEM achievement gap, according to a new study.

Expertise in science and technology can be a great career boost – but it can also be a great social divider: students from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to pursue STEM subjects in the later years of high school.

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